Reverse Brain Drain…

Reverse Brain Drain…

Recently,there was an interesting news item in Financial Express (FE) of  27th June 2011.It was titled :”NRIs head home, MNCs spoilt for choice.”

To read the piece directly on website of FE,please go to the following link:

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/nris-head-home-mncs-spoilt-for-choice/809257/0

On reading the article,I had sent my views on the subject matter to the Editor of FE,by way of a letter.

 This is what I had written to the Editor :


Dear Sir,

 

This refers to your article titled : “NRIs head home…” (FE 27th June 2011).

 

It appears that a fresh wave of Reverse Brain Drain has started.The reasons are attributed to :a) recent economic growth in India and b) many good opportunities opening up in various sectors.Also,many US MNCs have opened their offices here in India and so have started hiring more NRIs to target the growing markets. 

  

Reverse Brain Drain is commonly believed to be because of a logical outcome of a calculated strategy, where NRIs accumulate savings  and develop skills overseas that can be finally used in their home country.

 

It also occurs when scientists/engineers/other intellectuals migrate to a lesser developed country to study in its elite universities,do research and gain practical experience in areas where education and employment opportunities are limited in their own home countries.These professionals finally flock back to their home country after years of experience and either start as entrepreneurs,work as faculties in a university, or work for MNCs in their home country.

 

In addition to above,some other reasons for the migration of Indian highly skilled work force is due to their desire to return to their roots,enjoy a more family-oriented lifestyle, and to some extent, for security concerns in the post 9/11 period where many Asian Indians have been discriminated against because they are often mistaken for Arabs.
 
Recently,there has also been a different type of reverse brain drain as well.M
any second-generation Indians are now coming back to the country.So, reverse brain drain is no longer limited to the commonly perceived migration from a developed to a developing country by a first generation Indian. Many of the world’s top multinational companies are beginning to send their top Indian minds to head their companies in India.As a result,when we lose some,we win many back as well.This augurs well for the brains as well as for the countries.How long this wave will last is anybody’s guess. Let both parties enjoy the fruits of this change,meanwhile.

 

J S BROCA

New Delhi. 

Well,today’s issue of FE has published an abridged version of my letter reading as under :



Letters to the editor


The Financial Express

Saturday, Jul 02, 2011 





: Reverse brain drainApropos of the news item “NRIs head home, MNCs spoilt for choice” (FE, June 27), a fresh wave of reverse brain drain has started. The reasons are attributed to economic growth in India and good opportunities opening up in various sectors. Also, many US MNCs have opened their offices in India and so have started hiring more NRIs to target the growing markets. Reverse brain drain is commonly believed to occur because of the logical outcome of a calculated strategy, where NRIs accumulate savings and develop skills overseas that can be finally used in their home country.

It also occurs when scientists/engineers/other intellectuals migrate to developed countries to study in elite universities, do research and gain practical experience in areas where education and employment opportunities are limited in their home countries. These professionals finally flock back to their home country after years of experience and contribute to its growth. Recently, there has been a different type of reverse brain drain. Many second-generation Indians are coming back to the country. So, reverse brain drain is no longer limited to the commonly perceived migration from a developed to a developing country by a first generation Indian.

JS Broca, New Delhi

Your views/responses will be appreciated.

  



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3 Responses
  1. J S Broca says:

    Dear Readers,
    Please go to the following link to read my letter on website of FE :

    http://www.financialexpress.com/news/letters-to-the-editor/811560/0

    J S Broca
    New Delhi
    2nd July 2011

  2. U Atreya Sarma says:

    In the present milieu of globalisation, any talk of “brain drain” whether onward or reverse would be superfluous, I suppose. In fact, the expression “drain” is a misnomer, for what’s involved is only optimisation of the resources of brain. An aspiring person likes to have his intelligence, knowledge, wisdom, and creativity to be put to good use – and such people are naturally attracted to facilities or places or countries that have the propitious environment for their abilities and talents to bloom. Our country, instead of bemoaning the loss of migration of talent, should create conditions here for the retention of the talent, not its stunting or imprisonment. Unfortunately, our country is steeped in all-pervasive corruption, sluggish bureaucracy, and sectarian/divisive dispensation.

  3. Hana Iese says:

    Hello.This article was really fascinating, particularly since I was browsing for thoughts on this issue last Wednesday.

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