Archive for » September, 2011 «

Crime And Punishment…

Crime And Punishment…This posting is not about Crime and Punishment  a famous  novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky,which was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger in twelve monthly installments during 1866 and which  was later published in a single volume. This is about a corrupt IAS Officer of Patna, Bihar,who has been the subject of many articles in several media publications.His crime is that he was found to have amassed a lot of wealth through corrupt means.His trial is going on and in due course,he will receive punishment as per the court’s verdict.Meanwhile,pending trial,Nitish Kumar,the Chief Minister of Bihar,has taken a bold initiative of confiscating his huge house and opening a school for the down-trodden sections of the society,in these palatial premises.I first read the story through an Editorial in Financial Express.To read it on FE’s website,go to :

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/bihar-formula/845115/0 The bold initiative impressed me and in response,this is what I wrote to FE :

Dear Sir, This refers to your eye-catching editorial titled “Bihar Formula” (FE 12th Sept 2011) lauding Nitish Kumar’s bold action of confiscating the palatial house of a corrupt,suspended IAS officer,charged with amassing wealth beyond his known sources of income,even while the trial is on,and shifting a local school from a slum area to the new premises,much to the delight  and comfort of the students and teachers. This is a good lesson for other corrupt bureaucrats.Nitish’s formula of punishing the greedy and helping the needy will pave the way for other political leaders to follow the example of confiscating such properties of the “have-s” and using them for the good of the “have-nots”. Let us hope that after Anna Effect , “Nitish Effect” , will help to tackle the demon of corruption, meaningfully.Let us also hope that this is a not a one-time “show” for garnering votes but becomes a new tool for discharging,what can now be termed as PSR (Political Social Responsibility) like the much-hyped initiatives of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) hitherto. J S BROCA,New DelhiI am pleased to note that my views have been published in Letters to The Editor column in today’s FE,as under :Letters to the editor,The Financial Express,Monday, Sep 19, 2011 

Nitish effect  :Apropos of the editorial “Bihar formula” (FE, September 12), lauding Nitish Kumar’s bold action of confiscating the palatial house of a corrupt, suspended IAS officer, charged with amassing wealth beyond his known sources of income, and shifting a local school from a slum area to the new premises, is a good lesson for other corrupt bureaucrats. Nitish’s formula of punishing the greedy and helping the needy will pave the way for other political leaders to follow the example of confiscating such properties of the ‘haves’ and using them for the good of the ‘have-nots’. Let us hope that after the Anna effect, Nitish effect will help to tackle the demon of corruption, meaningfully. Let us also hope that this is a not a one-time ‘show’ for garnering votes but becomes a new tool for discharging, what can now be termed as PSR (political social responsibility) like the much-hyped initiatives of CSR (corporate social responsibility) hitherto. JS Broca, New Delhi.

To read my letter on FE’s website,go to :http://www.financialexpress.com/news/letters-to-the-editor/848385/0

I am also pleased to inform my readers,that a similar article was there in BUSINESS STANDARD a few days ago and I had responded to it as usual, with my views on the subject and lo behold,my views have also found some space in the Letters column of BS today as under :




Letters :Time for Nitish-Effect .Business Standard New Delhi September 19,2011:This refers to Satyavrat Mishra’s interesting article “At home in school” (September 17). Nitish Kumar’s bold action of confiscating the house of a corrupt IAS officer and turning it into a school for children will serve as a good lesson for other corrupt bureaucrats. Let us hope that after the Anna-effect, the “Nitish-effect” will help tackle corruption meaningfully. Let us also hope that this is a not a one-time “show” for garnering votes but becomes a new tool for discharging PSR (Political Social Responsibility) like the much-hyped CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility).J S Broca, New Delhi.

To read the original article on website of BS,go to : http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/at-home-in-school/449408/



My views on the subject matter can also be seen live, below the articles on the websites of other newspapers. I shall give you leads to the articles in my comments below the posting.Meanwhile,like me,savour the moment,read and react !



The Man For All Seasons..

The Man For All Seasons….


On the occasion of  35th death anniversary of the legendary singer MUKESH,there was a very interesting article in my favourite paper SCREEN in its issue dated 2-8th Sept 2011.


To read the same at length on the website,please go to :


 http://www.screenindia.com/news/the-man-for-all-seasons/839736/


On reading the piece,this is what I had written in response to the Editor of Screen :


Dear Editor,
Rajiv Vijayakar’s tribute to Mukesh on his 35th death Anniversary,titled “The man for all seasons”in Screen of 2-8 th Sept 2011,was a very emotional piece that re-connected his fans to this great singer,who has left such an impact on the Hindi film industry that he is still remembered by lovers of great,meaningful and soulfully rendered songs.It may be recalled that Mukesh  was such an ardent fan of late K L Saigal,that in his early years he used to imitate his idol. It is reported that when K. L. Saigal first heard the song Dil Jalta Hai To Jalne De, he remarked, “That’s strange, I don’t recall singing that song”.What more proof can be there of Mukesh’s versatility ? Hindi films and music lovers of yester years will also recall the incident reported at the time of his death on 27th August 1976.When news of his death reached Raj Kapoor, he had burst into tears, and had remarked, “I have lost my voice,” which is indeed a great testimony to the association of Mukesh’s playback voice with the highly popular songs of Raj Kapoor.Right from his first foray into singing from 1945 in Pehli Nazar to his songs( picturised after his death ) in Satyam Shivam Sundaram in 1978,the journey of Mukesh,has left many milestones on the way, to mark the meastro’s mastery and skill over his unique and mesmerising voice.Several awards like the National Film Awards,Filmfare Awards and nominations and Bengal Film Journalists Association  awards, certified that Mukesh’s golden voice was his fans’ delight.One stanza of Mukesh’s
famous song “Jeena Yahan Marna Yahan ” goes like this : ” Kal Khel Mein Hum Ho Na Ho,Gardish Mein Taare Rahenge Sada,Bhoolenge Hum Bhoologe Tum,Par Hum Tumhare Rahenge Sada,Rahenge Yahin Apne Nishan,Iske Siva Jana Kahan…” Yes, these words echo the thoughts of miliions of Mukesh’s fans-he is no more but his footprints left on the sands of time, will remain,our cherished legacy.
 
J S BROCA
NEW DELHI  


After waiting  till yesterday and seeing that Screen’s latest issue had not published my letter, after a lot of failed attempts, I could post the following abridged version of my comments below the article on the website : 

MUKESH by J S BROCA on 2011-09-16 22:19:57.961485+05:30 Rajiv Vijayakar’s emotional tribute to Mukesh ,re-connected his fans to this great singer,who has left such an impact on the Hindi film industry that he is still remembered by lovers of soulfully rendered songs.When news of his death had reached Raj Kapoor, he had burst into tears, and had remarked, “I have lost my voice,” which is indeed a great testimony to the association of Mukesh’s playback voice with the highly popular songs of Raj Kapoor. The musical journey of Mukesh,has left many milestones on the way, to mark the meastro’s mastery and skill over his unique and mesmerising voice. Several awards received by him,certified that his golden voice was his fans’ delight.One stanza of Mukesh’s famous song “Jeena Yahan Marna Yahan ” goes like this : ” Kal Khel Mein Hum Ho Na Ho,Gardish Mein Taare Rahenge Sada,Bhoolenge Hum Bhoologe Tum,Par Hum Tumhare Rahenge Sada,Rahenge Yahin Apne Nishan,Iske Siva Jana Kahan…” Yes, these words echo the thoughts of miliions of Mukesh’s fans-he is no more but his footprints left on the sands of time,will remain,our cherished legacy.

J S BROCA,NEW DELHI.

I am sure,there are many many more fans of Mukesh out there.I shall love to have your response.

Long Live Mukesh !

  

Frog Soup,Any one ?

Frog Soup,Any one ?


Food inflation has been a matter of debate and discussion in the media.It has crossed double digits. A news item in BUSINESS STANDARD of 2nd Sept 2011 made me think and send my comments to the editor as under :


Dear Sir,


This refers to your article :”Food inflation in double digits…” in BS of 2nd Sept 2011.Earlier too the print media had reported about the PM’s serious concern about inflation in his Independence day message.The PM deserves all praise for recognising that the demon called inflation,needs to be tamed,more seriously because of reports of slowdown in world economy begining with USA.However,it is a very difficult task. An interesting observation made by Ric Edelman,a financial expert and a strategist,is called the “Boiling Frog Syndrome”. He introduced the idea to explain how the American public has come to accept a certain amount of inflation as normal, despite the ease of producing sound arguments that inflation works against our best efforts to plan and build wealth over the long term.Here is Edelman’s account of the syndrome: “If you throw a frog into a pot of boiling water, he’ll jump out. But if you place a frog into a pot of lukewarm water and slowly turn up the heat, it will boil to death. And so it is with inflation. We’ve grown accustomed to inflation over the past 25 years,but that doesn’t mean we don’t continue to be hurt by its effect”. It Is now perhaps the same syndrome that is responsible for inflation affecting Indian economy.This frog certainly needs watching. J S BROCA,New Delhi.


After waiting for a few days,I am happy to know that BS has featured an abridged version of my letter in today’s issue,as under : 

Letters :Frogs in a boiling pot ? 

Business Standard / New Delhi September 13, 2011.

This refers to the article “Food inflation in double digits after 5 months” (September 2). The prime minister deserves praise for recognising that inflation needs to be tamed, especially in view of reports of a slowdown in the world economy.

Ric Edelman, a financial expert and strategist, had made an interesting observation called the “boiling frog syndrome” to explain how the American public had come to accept a certain amount of inflation as normal. Here is Edelman’s account of the syndrome: “If you throw a frog into a pot of boiling water, he’ll jump out. But if you place a frog into a pot of lukewarm water and slowly turn up the heat, it will boil to death. And so it is with inflation. We’ve grown accustomed to inflation over the past 25 years,but that doesn’t mean we don’t continue to be hurt by its effect.” The same syndrome perhaps affects India too.

J S Broca, New Delhi


To read my letter on website of BUSINESS STANDARD,please go to :


To read the original article of 2nd Sept.,go to :


  

More the merrier..?

More the merrier ?


Please read my posting dated 1st Sept 2011 titled :”Are More Banks Needed ?” regarding my letter in Business Standard dated 1st September 2011.I had sent the same letter to FE also.Today on 12th Sept 2011,FE has also published my letter with the captioned title.Now you can see the differences in the editorial policies of two financial dailies-BS and FE.Same matter was sent to both but each of them published a different abridged edited version of its own.Here is my letter as published in FE today :


Letters to the editor


The Financial Express
Monday, Sep 12, 2011    
More the merrier? 
 

If RBI grants banking licences to industrial houses, in near future, we may have several new banks with, say, names such as Tata Bank, Birla Bank, Ranbaxy Bank, Bajaj Bank, Religare Bank, etc. Currently there are as many as 23 public sector banks in the country (excluding 5 subsidiary banks of SBI), 18 private sector banks, a huge list of co-operative banks (both scheduled and non-scheduled) and several foreign banks with business and branches in India. Does the adage “More the merrier” augur well for this move? Certainly not. The intentions of RBI may be good (financial inclusion, competition, etc) but does RBI have the machinery and the manpower to monitor the performance of various types of banks in the country? Definitely not. This is clear from the large number of scams, frauds, failures exposed in the banking sector. Banking is definitely an industry, but all industry is certainly not banking. With industrial houses having core competencies in several areas, it is far fetched to assume that they will also do well in banking which involves varied degrees of risks.
JS Broca
New Delhi

To read the letter on FE’s website,go to :


To read my earlier letter in BS of 1st Sept 2011,go to :


Viva the difference !!


Cricket and cars…


Cricket and Cars

Comparisons are odious.Comparing apples with oranges and chalk with cheese are common examples, quoted in this context.
 

To compare apples and oranges means to examine the similarities of things that are completely different .For example,comparing the average wages of workers and managers is like trying to compare apples and oranges.The term is usually used to explain that two different things cannot be compared. 
The term chalk and cheese means that two things might possibly be confused as similar but which are in fact,very different. There are several phrases that suggest one thing is interchangeable with another, e.g. ‘a change is as good as a rest’, ‘enough is as good as a feast’. I can’t think of another that specifically draws a distinction between two things like ‘as different as chalk and cheese’. Why the need to make the distinction? After all, chalk and cheese aren’t similar enough for anyone to confuse them.

I chuckled to read a snippet comparing CRICKET with CARS this morning : Here is the snippet :
Sixer! : Drawing a cars and cricket comparison—car sales are slowing down in India and the Indian cricket team’s performance is making all of us cringe— Fiat India CEO Rajeev Kapoor said that both were “temporary blips”. Even though the Indian team hasn’t been able to score a single win in the England series so far, this does not take away from the fact that we are still the world champions—with a lot of promise. Even though car sales are nose-diving today, the fundamentals of the sector remain strong. His comments managed to bring a long-awaited smile onto the faces of the large number of delegates gathered together at the 51st SIAM (Society of Indian Auto Manufacturers) Annual Convention.
What are your views dear readers ? 



Cake for thought…

Cake for thought…


Yesterday I had blogged a piece titled :”Eat Cake,Pay Tax”.At the end of the posting,I had expressed my doubts as to whether my letter would find favour with the Editor of a serious paper.Lo and behold,today’s Financial Express has published my letter with a few snips and cuts here and there.This now makes me comment that if your joke is really good it will certainly find its mark. Here is the letter as published in FE :  


Letters to the editor

The Financial Express
Wednesday, Sep 07, 2011 
 

Cake for thought  

“Eat cake, pay tax” by Amitendu Palit (FE, September 5) was a refreshing read. The piece reminded me of the famous phrase: “Let them eat cake”, attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette of France. It was supposedly spoken by the Queen upon learning that the peasants had no bread. Since cake is a richer product, as opposed to normal bread, the quote supposedly reflected her obliviousness to the condition of the people in those times. Incidentally, even in the Chinese culture, there is reportedly a similar story that involves rice and meat, instead of bread and cake: An ancient Chinese emperor, who upon being told that his subjects didn’t have enough rice to eat, replied: “Why don’t they eat meat?” Taxing moon cakes is a novel idea for the local tax authorities of China to extract their pound of flesh and it certainly lends credence to another popular phrase: “You can’t have your cake and eat it too”. Let us hope that our Income Tax authorities don’t get inspired from this supposedly new area of revenue and think of taxing gifts customarily exchanged during Diwali and Christmas. Kudos to the author for giving the readers some alternate form of fodder and food (cake) for thought.  

JS Broca, New Delhi

Those who wish to see my letter as published may go to : 


This  publication has left a sweet taste in my mouth. 

  

Eat cake,pay tax…

Eat Cake,Pay Tax…

In Financial Express of 5th September 2011,there was an interesting column titled :”Eat cake, pay tax” regarding local tax authorities deciding to tax mooncakes in China.Here is the link to the article :


http://www.financialexpress.com/news/column-eat-cake-pay-tax/841690/0


Here is my reaction to the above piece,sent as a letter to the editor :

Dear Sir,your column :”Eat Cake,Pay Tax” is a refreshing change from usual serious or mundane topics discussed in FE.The piece reminded me of the famous phrase :” Let them eat cake”, commonly attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette of France.It was supposedly spoken by the Queen, upon learning that the peasants had no bread. Since cake was a richer product , as opposed to normal bread, the quote supposedly had reflected her obliviousness to the condition of the people in those times.
Incidentally, even in the Chinese culture, there is reportedly a similar story that involves rice and meat, instead of bread and cake: An ancient Chinese emperor who, being told that his subjects didn’t have enough rice to eat, replied: ‘Why don’t they eat meat?’
Taxing moon cakes is a novel idea for the local tax authorities of China to extract their pound of flesh and it certainly lends credence to another popular phrase :”You can’t eat your cake and have it too”.
Let us hope that our Income Tax authorities don’t get inspired from this supposedly new area of revenue and think of taxing gifts customarily exchanged during Diwali and Christmas in apna desh. Kudos to you,for giving your readers some alternate form of fodder and food for thought. 
J S BROCA
NEW DELHI

It is a well known fact that Income Tax authorities are always prowling for new sources of taxation to swell their kitty !

I am not sure whether my letter,written in a lighter vein will tickle the editor of a serious paper like FE. Let me see how the cake crumbles.

To know more about mooncakes,try this link:


Happy tasting !

 

The latest Air Tel ad….

THE LATEST AIR TEL AD :

The latest Air Tel ad has been immensely liked by many.Its lyrics vibe well with the present generation.Here are the lyrics of the ad :

LYRICS OF LATEST AIRTEL AD 


Chai ke Liye jaise toast hota hai—

Vaise har ek friend zaroori hota hai
Aise har ek friend zaroori hota hai

Koi subah paanch baje neend se jagaye
Koi raat ko teen baje jaan bachaye
Ek teri kadki mein sharing kare
Aur Ek tere budget mein sneak in kare
Koi nature se guest koi host hota hai
Par har ek friend zaroori hota hai

Ek ghadi ghadi kaam aaye par kabhi kabhi call kare
Ek kabhi kabhi kaam aaye aur ghadi ghadi call kare
Gossip ka koi ghoomta phirta satellite
Koi sath rahe toh kar de sab alright
Koi effortless koi forced hota hai
Lekin har ek friend zaroori hota hai
Chat Room friend koi classroom friend
Koi bike pe race wala vroom vroom friend
Shopping mall wala shopping friend
Koi Exam hall wala copying friend
Movie buddy groovy buddy

Hi buddy,Bye buddy,Joke buddy, Poke buddy
Gaana Buddy, Shaana buddy,
Chaddi Buddy, Yaar Buddy
Kutte—kamine—-
Everybody—-Sab buddy
A to Z

Gin gin ke naam bheja Roast hota hai
Par har ek friend zaroori hota hai
Lekin har ek friend zaroori hota hai

Read more:http://www.unp.me/f139/har-ek-friend-zaroori-hota-hai-airtel-lyrics-161029/#ixzz1WQwyy0qM 


Here is an appreciation of the ad by Rashmi Bansal : 



Har ek friend zaroori hota hai

By Rashmi Bansal, New Delhi, August 24, 2011
After a loooong time, I caught an ad on TV which truly captures the spirit of youth today.
Airtel’s ‘Har ek friend zaroori hota hai’.

This is the Facebook generation, where you can have 500 ‘friends’. Cynics wonder how can anyone have 500 friends. The truth is, you can. This isn’t the “yeh dosti hum nahin todenge’ kind of friendship. This is an acquaintance of casual utility, every kind of friend can have his/her role.
Jaise chai ke liye toast hota hai
Waise har ek friend zaroori hota hai.
 
The early morning friend, the late night savior, the guy who throws his house open, the guys who always pile on. The ones who borrow money from you, the ones who pay for you – the list is endless.

The line I liked best of all:
Ek  ghadi ghadi  kaam aaye, kabhi kabhi call kare
Ek kabhi kabhi kaam aaye aur ghadi ghadi call kare
Don’t we all know someone like that !
 

In short, it is a brilliant piece of work which is definitely going to catch on. The ad airing on TV is shorter while Youtube has the extended version (another great idea!). The Youtube video also features lyrics in sub-titles (TV version should do that too!)

Google does not reveal who’s composed the song and lyrics, or the agency behind the idea. But I surmise it is the effortless genius of Taproot, which is rumoured to be the new creative agency for Airtel.

Taproot is an independent creative agency headed by Agnello Dias and Santosh Padhi (both ex-JWT). Not as ‘famous’ as Piyush Pandey or Prasoon Joshi but their work speaks for itself.These are the guys who worked on the Nike Cricket ad (I thought that was amazing back in 2007) . And numerous Times of India campaigns (Lead India, Teach India and the “Day in the life of… ’ series).
Yessssss I am a fan.

And here is some excellent advice Agnello has for new entrants in the creative industry. In an interview to Adgully he says:In the creative field, success is not equivalent to talent. Success depends on resilience. It also depends on what pace you can keep coming back after a bounced ad or a released ad that has not done very well. Most of the successful people in the creative field are people with great(er) creative resilience than talent… youngsters should remember that. 

I agree 100%. Creativity is about a constant flow of ideas.Having the judgement which one to pick and run with.Discarding the ones you loved but did not work.Not operating from your ego or need to show cleverness but what is required, what is right, what is created from the head but finds its way to your heart.Over time – say 10-15-20 years – this starts coming to you naturally. Whether you are a musician, an artist, a writer or a copywriter.
And yes, if the System does not allow you to work in this way, you do what Agnello did. Your Own Thing. It is tough and hassly for creative people to become entrepreneurs (looking into finances and whatnot is a dull distraction from creative work!). But it is worth it.I hope there are more Taproots, more Agnellos, more unmundane advertising. Until then the remote control is your only saviour from sufferance and 7 day hairfall challenges. And impossibly shiny hair, whiter than white teeth and skin.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Dear Friends,watch the ad with lyrics on YOUTUBE by going to the following link :





Category: Humour, Ideas  One Comment

Are more banks needed ….?

Are more banks needed …?  

In Business Standard of 31st August 2011,there was a very good editorial about RBI’s draft guidelines for granting banking licences to industrial houses.

To read the same in detail, please go to the following link:http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/bankinglicences/447541/ 

In response to the above,I had written the following letter to the editor on the same day :

Dear Sir,

This is in response to your timely Editorial titled :”RBI sets tough entry norms..”in BS of 31st August 2011. If all goes well,with RBI’s move to grant banking licenses to industrial houses,in near future,we may have several new banks with say names as Tata Bank, Birla Bank, Ranbaxy Bank, Bajaj Bank, Religare Bank etc.As per the latest information from a reputed source,as per last count,there are presently 23 Public Sector Banks (excluding 5 subsidiary banks of SBI),18 Private Sector Banks, a huge list of Co-operative Banks ( both Scheduled and Non-Scheduled ) and several Foreign Banks with business and branches in India.Does the adage :”More the merrier” augur well for this move ? Certainly not.The intentions of RBI may be good (financial inclusion,competition,etc) but does RBI have the machinery and the manpower to monitor the performance of various types of banks in the country ? Definitely not.This is clear from the large number of scams,frauds,failures etc exposed in the banking sector,in the last decade alone.Banking is defintely an industry, but all industry is certainly not banking. With industrial houses having core competencies in several areas like Engineering,Pharma,Real Estate,etc, it is far fetched to assume that they will also do well in banking which has more and varied degrees of risks.A major area for concern will be monitoring possible diversion of funds from the banking ventures of industrial houses to their other group businesses.No doubt,with the growth in the Indian economy expected and projected to remain strong for quite some time-especially in its services sector-the demand for banking services, especially retail banking, mortgages and investment services is expected to be high but the existing list of banks is certainly enough to take care of the same.A better alternative,as advocated by various ministeries earlier,is consolidation, M&A, takeovers, and asset sales etc so as to have a strong,reliable,dependable banking system on which the common man can bank upon.A meaningful advise to these industrial houses,now desirous of venturing into banking would be to “stick to your knitting ” meaning in general terms, that if a company sticks to their knitting, they continue to do what they have always done instead of trying to do something they know very little about. 

J S BROCA,NEW DELHI 

Today’s BS (01.09.2011) has published a highly edited version of my letter as under :

Letters :Too much to handle ? 

This refers to the edit “Banking on licences” (August 31). At present, we have a number of public and private sector banks, a huge list of co-operative banks (scheduled and non-scheduled) and several foreign banks with business and branches inIndia. The question is if it would be better to add more banks to this list. The Reserve Bank ofIndia’s (RBI’s) intentions may be good – financial inclusion, competition and so on – but does the central bank have the machinery and the manpower to monitor the performance of various types of banks in the country. Definitely not. This is clear from the considerable number of scams, frauds and failures that were exposed in the banking sector in the last decade alone.Another major concern will be monitoring the possible diversion of funds from the banking ventures of industrial houses to their other group businesses. No doubt, with the economic growth projected to remain strong – particularly in the services sector – the demand for banking services, especially retail banking, mortgages and investment services is expected to be high. But the current list of banks is certainly enough to take care of this demand. A better alternative is consolidation, mergers and acquisitions, takeovers and asset sales to have a strong and reliable banking system on which the common man can depend. J S BROCA ,New Delhi.

To read the letter on the web site of BS directly,please go to : http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/letters-too-much-to-handle/447701/ To zoom in on the printed version of my letter page,please try the following link :

http://epaper.business-standard.com/bsepaper/svww_zoomart.php?Artname=20110901aT012101004&ileft=236&itop=1278&zoomRatio=202&AN=20110901aT012101004

My comments on the edited version of my letter are as under : 

1. Serious business papers take everything seriously.

2.They are devoid of sense of humour.

3.They know which side their bread is buttered so they refrain from being sarcastic.

4.They don’t seem to like statistics-vital or otherwise, for fear of being mis-quoted.

5.They always have space constraints !  

All said and done, getting my views across ,was the crux of the matter.

Let us now wait and see what finally happens on the banking scenario.